Pennsylvania Colonial Brochure

Pennsylania

History

Everyone should come from all over to visit the colony of Pennsylvania that was shown by the charter of 1681 to have been established in 1681! Come one, come all because even though the colony was established to practice the Quaker religion, there is religious freedom, so anyone can practice anything. This is wonderful for the proprietor of Pennsylvania William Penn because he was a Quaker and was persecuted for not following the established church. It’s no wonder anyone would want to visit this colony, with all its interesting history!

William_Penn

Though that is interesting, the story behind Pennsylvania’s beginning is even more! Admiral Penn, William’s father, helped King Charles the second by loaning him money to help him gain the throne. Later on, Admiral Penn died! Obviously, King Charles the second couldn’t pay back Admiral Penn. So, when his son, William Penn became interested in beginning a colony, the king found his way. Instead of paying back Admiral Penn, he gave William the Charter of 1681 and 45,000 square miles of land named Pennsylvania, in Admiral Penn’s honor.

Geography

To come to Pennsylvania, you’ll need to know how to get there! First of all, the colony Pennsylvania is a middle colony. But if you don’t know where the middle colonies are, there are some states around it! For example, New York is to the north of it. Also Maryland is to the south and to the east is New Jersey. Finally, to the west is Virginia.

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Also when you come you’ll want to know the area. So here are the physical features of Pennsylvania! Mountains, Lake Eerie, and the Atlantic Ocean all act as natural borders. The Atlantic Ocean is a border between Europe and Pennsylvania. There are also smaller water sources such as the Ohio River and the Allegheny River that also act as borders. They border Pennsylvania and Ohio, separating the two. There are many other smaller rivers that cut off other parts off Pennsylvania

Government

So now you know what it is like there, but who is there, will it be just you? No, of course not! Those who bought land in Pennsylvania were generally the English and Dutch Quakers that. Those people began immigrating to Pennsylvania in 1682! Not only was the religion of Quaker practiced but the religion of Mennonite was also a religion frequently practiced in Pennsylvania. But really any religion would be accepted into Pennsylvania because of Freedom of Religion.

In Pennsylvania, not many people went to School. But generally children did know how to read the Bible and write. But just because not many kids were educated and went to school doesn’t mean they didn’t work hard! Everyone worked hard. Boys worked with their fathers on farms, while girls worked with their mother (generally inside; cooking, cleaning, house chores).

williampennA

People and Culture

In Pennsylvania, there were a lot of good resources. Those included rich soil, iron, and glass. From that people created wheat, corn, and rye. All of those products were then sold or traded at market.

Indentured servants and slave were used as the colony’s source of labor. Indentured servants made deals with people for them to pay for the voyage to Pennsylvania, and in return the people would work for no pay for a certain amount of years. Slaves were forced to work for no pay. But aside from that people generally did there own work. In Pennsylvania wasn’t just farmers there were also wheelwrights, mechanics, barbers, printers, cabinetmakers, jewelers, metal workers (working with pewter, silver, gold, brass, and tin), leather workers, weavers, locksmiths, shoemakers, coopers, and tailors. Women were more likely to work as ribbon weavers, lace weavers, button makers, milliners, and dressmakers.

Economics

In Pennsylvania, there were a lot of good resources. Those included rich soil, iron, and glass. From that people created wheat, corn, and rye. All of those products were then sold or traded at market.

Indentured servants and slave were used as the colony’s source of labor. Indentured servants made deals with people for them to pay for the voyage to Pennsylvania, and in return the people would work for no pay for a certain amount of years. Slaves were forced to work for no pay. But aside from that people generally did there own work. In Pennsylvania wasn’t just farmers there were also wheelwrights, mechanics, barbers, printers, cabinetmakers, jewelers, metal workers (working with pewter, silver, gold, brass, and tin), leather workers, weavers, locksmiths, shoemakers, coopers, and tailors. Women were more likely to work as ribbon weavers, lace weavers, button makers, milliners, and dressmakers.

Work Cited

Works Cited

Hinman, Bonnie. "Pennsylvania." Map. Pennsylvania: William Penn and the City of Brotherly Love. 20. Print.

Hinman, Bonnie. Pennsylvania: William Penn and the City of Brotherly Love. Hockessin, DE: Mitchell Lane, 2007. Print.

Hintz, Martin. "The Pennsylvania Colonies, 1763." Map. 7. Print.

Hintz, Martin. The Pennsylvania Colony. Mankato, MN: Capstone, 2006. Print.

Hintz, Martin. "The Thirteen Colonies, 1763." Map. The Pennsylvania Colony. 25. Print.

Image of William Penn. Digital image. Bucks County Moving Forward. Web. 8 Dec. 2010. <http://www.buckscounty.org/Images/About/William_Penn.jpg>.

An image of William Penn. Digital image. Web. 10 Dec. 2010. <http://www.harlingen.isd.tenet.edu/coakhist/williampennA.jpg>.

Italia, Bob. The Pennsylvania Colony. Edina, MN: ABDO Pub., 2001. Print.

Sherrow, Victoria. Pennsylvania. San Diego, CA: Lucent, 2002. Print.

Trumbauer, Lisa, and Karin A. Wulf. Pennsylvania, 1643-1776. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society, 2005. Print.

Wiener, Roberta, and James R. Arnold. "Pennsylvania Colony." Map. Pennsylvania: the History of Pennsylvania Colony, 1681-1776. 50. Print.

Wiener, Roberta, and James R. Arnold. Pennsylvania: the History of Pennsylvania Colony, 1681-1776. Chicago, IL: Raintree, 2005. Print.

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